ArC-GEM at Little Rock Tech Fest 2019!

By | Announcements | No Comments

Big Data Comes to Biology: Portable Genome Sequencing

DNA sequencing will soon be possible from small mobile devices connected to a mobile phone. This workshop will demonstrate use of a hand-held sequencing device, that is about the same size as a Snicker’s candy bar. A brief overview of DNA sequencing will be discussed, along with some examples of high-throughput comparison of genome sequences. Personal genome sequencing from companies like 23andme and AncestoryDNA will be discussed, in the context of a general overview of current technologies and potential future applications.

David W. Ussery, Ph.D., Invested in Inaugural Helen Adams & Arkansas Research Alliance Endowed Chair in Bioinformatics

By | Announcements, Awards | No Comments

David W. Ussery, Ph.D., director of the Arkansas Center for Genomic and Epidemiology and MedicineĀ at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (UAMS), was invested Feb. 21 as the inaugural recipient of the Helen Adams & Arkansas Research Alliance (ARA) Endowed Chair in Biomedical Informatics.

Continue reading...

UAMS Researcher David Ussery Named ARA Scholar

By | Announcements, Awards | No Comments

UAMS biomedical informatics researcher David Ussery, Ph.D. was named Arkansas Research Alliance (ARA) Scholar at a news conference today at the State Capitol.

Ussery was presented with a certificate by Gov. Asa Hutchinson, ARA Board of Trustees Chair Sonja Hubbard and UAMS Provost and Chief Academic Officer Stephanie Gardner, Pharm.D., Ed.D., and UAMS College of Medicine Dean Pope Moseley, M.D., receiving $500,000 to further his research.

Ussery joined UAMS in May and is director of the Arkansas Center for Genomic and Ecological Medicine at UAMS. He has been working with biomedical informatics analysis of bacterial genomes since 1995. Biomedical informatics extracts knowledge from large amounts of biological data with computers rather than in a traditional laboratory. His work in third-generation sequencing has some exciting potential applications for a range of emerging infections. For example, he is collaborating with the Arkansas Department of Health on a project that could lead to rapid diagnosis of the Zika virus.

Continue reading the full article ...